I am originally from St. Petersburg, Russia, where I had my formative introduction to arts and culture. Growing up in that environment I was surrounded by two artistic worlds; the great Russo-European traditions of the city’s museums, architecture, and performing arts, but also the underground cultural explosion that came with the end of the Cold War – rockers, hippies, and a youthful fascination with the ‘new.’

Since I left Russia in the early 1990s, I have developed in several directions across  different places. I spent a few years near London in the UK, before moving to Birmingham, Alabama for six years. It was in Birmingham that my art-making began to shape up. Maybe because of the studio courses at the University of Alabama at Birmingham, or maybe because of the southern charm?

Part of my Arabian Nights series
The Fisherman and the Jinni, from my Arabian Nights series

Since 2002, I have lived and worked in the Washington, DC area.  I have painted, photographed, and completed a master’s degree at Georgetown, studying cultural diplomacy and Cambodian cultural regeneration. In terms of artistic inspiration, DC is the great place as it’s full of diverse people, world-renowned museums, and space to breathe. In addition to Washington, DC, I spend a lot of time in Paris and Brittany with my family, soaking up French arts, culture, and the joie-de-vivre along the way!

I have always been creative, but it has taken a long build to get to where I am now. At the age of 15, I bought a box of oil paints and started painting on any surface that I could find: cardboard, broken guitar backs, or vinyl. I haven’t had a moment of a single transformative art school, but I’ve learned from great talents throughout – at the UAB; at the Corcoran College of Art and Design; in the Maroger studio of artist Robert White; and by seeing countless exhibitions and museums I visit no matter where I go.

From my Candy and Mementoes series
From my Candy and Mementoes series

Over the years, I’ve worked in different mediums: narrative drawing, abstraction, photography and design, but am currently settled on a rooting in the Old Dutch Masters’ still lifes, with modern interpretation. These days I create vivid depictions of simple objects, which often convey much richer meaning than the elaborate. The style requires a large amount of layering, time, and patience, but ultimately it’s incomparable as a way of depicting still life. Making the still life (nature-morte) alive. My work expressly balances seriousness and humor, elegance and simplicity, tradition and modernity – it picks up the breezes from travel, theatre literature, and food.

Elephant on Red Jawbreaker
Elephant on Red Jawbreaker
Elephant work in progress

My inspiration is mainly in slowing down the fast pace of society and zooming in to objects with a certain meaning. I seek out and depict possible objects of desire, beauty and satisfaction – sometimes in the overtly beautiful, and often in the mundane. Candy and toys receive the same attention as fine porcelain figurines, capable of attracting the willing eye and triggering lighthearted memories and pleasure.

When preparing for a show, I tend to look for a common theme which can be explored through different objects. One of my series, Candy and Mementoes, explores the nostalgia and tactile charm that people have for childhood candy. The other, the Arabian Nights, interprets the tales from One Thousand and One Nights, merging  the cultural traditions of the East and the West.

Sinbad the Seaman
Sinbad the Seaman from my Arabian Nights series

You can find my work on my website at annakatalkina.com.


See two of Anna’s paintings in Main Street Arts’ fourth annual “Small Works” exhibition (juried by Cory E. Card, former curator at View Arts Center in Old Forge, NY). The exhibition runs through January 4, 2018. Anna’s piece, “Clay Duck and White Jellybeans” received a juror’s choice award for the exhibition!

Recent Posts

Laura Bianco-Martinez

I am a landscape painter living in the Hudson Valley of New York working primarily in pastels and encaustics. After a career as an art educator I know focus on

Read More »

Elizabeth Caputo

Pictured: Elizabeth in her studio I had a friend a couple of Christmas’s ago take me aside to say “I really like your paintings, but your sculptures are just better”.

Read More »

Mark Lavatelli

In 1976, after studying and teaching art history, I decided to focus on the creation and study of paintings. In graduate school in New Mexico I encountered an area of

Read More »

Rachael Gootnick

I have loved books, and art, ever since I was a child, but I never could have imagined I’d end up here, living my life as a book artist. Life

Read More »

Molly Uravitch

Originally from the Washington DC area I have now settled in Sioux Falls, SD where I teach and run the ceramics facility at Augustana University. I hold a MFA in Ceramics

Read More »

Chihiro Makio

I was born and raised in Japan, and decided that I would rather attend an art school in the states than in Japan. Creating something has always been my passion

Read More »

Laura Bianco-Martinez

I am a landscape painter living in the Hudson Valley of New York working primarily in pastels and encaustics. After a career as an art educator I know focus on

Read More »

Elizabeth Caputo

Pictured: Elizabeth in her studio I had a friend a couple of Christmas’s ago take me aside to say “I really like your paintings, but your sculptures are just better”.

Read More »

Mark Lavatelli

In 1976, after studying and teaching art history, I decided to focus on the creation and study of paintings. In graduate school in New Mexico I encountered an area of

Read More »

Rachael Gootnick

I have loved books, and art, ever since I was a child, but I never could have imagined I’d end up here, living my life as a book artist. Life

Read More »

Molly Uravitch

Originally from the Washington DC area I have now settled in Sioux Falls, SD where I teach and run the ceramics facility at Augustana University. I hold a MFA in Ceramics

Read More »

Chihiro Makio

I was born and raised in Japan, and decided that I would rather attend an art school in the states than in Japan. Creating something has always been my passion

Read More »

3 Responses

  1. Anna’s description of her work and its effect is understated. The Dutch Old Masters still life paintings are physically small, but one can light up an entire room by itself. How can a 6 inch-by-6 inch painting of an elephant standing on a jawbreaker hold so much—childhood whimsey, elephantine majesty, and an intricate study in lighting? Keep up the good work, Anna, it makes life so much more enjoyable!

  2. I can spend years in Anna’s studio. Mesmerized.

    She is painting the still life, but nothing is still in her work. The jelly bins storm, the candies land for the crimson hippopotamus’s dessert. The elephant is dancing in the dry leaves – roll tide ! The frog is playing lute, the LP’s baroque from nowhere and everywhere intermingls with the rainbow.

    Myriads of the curious ancient and modern objects swirl with the visiting friends, the hungry squirrels, the artists, and writers who seem to never leave their books or their chairs.

    I have seen her paintings inside the big mansions and in cozy apartments on several continents. Her small squares seem to be the channels, the time machines uniting people of any background, bringing a kind smile and a bit of nostalgia to any space, to the past and to the present, to the memory and dreams, still and moving. She is the master of “both”.

  3. I love Anna’s work. It has been fascinating to watch her grow and develop over the years. She is such an inspiring person, in her art and in her life. Knowing her is a pleasure, and it has been a joy to live with her paintings in our home.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Closed 7/28 through 8/3:

We will be closed to the public Friday, July 28 through Thursday, August 4 as we install our next exhibition, Inspired By Nature. Please join us for the opening reception on Friday, August 4 from 5 to 8pm!