Momoko Takeshita Keane

Momoko Takeshita Keane

Ceramic artist Momoko Takeshita Keane
Ceramic artist Momoko Takeshita Keane

The real heart of ceramics for me is simply the effect of fire on clay.

The technique I use to form my ceramic sculpture is called coil building. Slender ropes of clay called coils are wound in a spiral, and pinched one upon another, to build the desired shape.

"Embrace" (left) and "Fissure" (right) by Momoko Takeshita Keane
“Embrace” (left) and “Fissure” (right) by Momoko Takeshita Keane
Then the work is fired in a Japanese-style kiln called an anagama that is heated by burning wood. It is the effects of this burning wood on the clay — and how it brings out the inherent qualities of the clay — that is the essence of my work.

Momoko's work, alongside other artists' work, loaded into the kiln (left); and work outside of the kiln after it has been fired.
Momoko’s work, alongside other artists’ work, loaded into the kiln (left); and work outside of the kiln after it has been fired.

The mouth of the anagma kiln (left); stoking the fire with wood (right)
The mouth of the anagama kiln (left); stoking the fire with wood (right)

I studied ceramics originally in the ancient kiln town of Shigaraki, Japan, but there weren’t so many opportunities there for me as a woman at that time to do wood-firing. After moving to Ithaca, I began to fire in the anagama that Fred Herbst runs at Corning Community College. The colors and effects on the clay from this kiln are more than I could have expected. Much of my work has been born there including the series called Embrace that has been accepted in many international ceramic competitions.

"In Praise of Nature" runs through July 31, 2018 on the second floor at Main Street Arts in Clifton Springs.
“In Praise of Nature” runs through July 31, 2018 on the second floor at Main Street Arts in Clifton Springs.
I am so pleased to have had the chance to exhibit this work at the Main Street Arts gallery.

In Praise of Nature, an exhibition featuring wood-fired ceramic sculpture by Momoko Takeshita Keane, runs through July 31, 2018 on the second floor at Main Street Arts.

Recent Posts

Ryann Cooley

While I describe myself as a mixed media artist, I am fortunate to have been granted access to the world as a photographer. Having worked

Read More »

Sunny Moxin Chen

As a Moscow-born-Chinese who migrated to the U.S. since high school, I consciously and unconsciously use my art as a medium to link my multi-cultural

Read More »

Carol Nickol

From the moment I entered metal class roughly 25 years ago, I knew metal was going to be the major focus in my life from

Read More »

Jesse Aridoux

What interests me most are the stories. We blaze through life like shooting stars, and we leave fragments of stories scattered behind us like autumn

Read More »

Louis Quaintance

Demonstration Plastik abb.163, the piece included in the Small Works exhibition, is a signature work, a particularly interesting bronze sculpture in the collection… describing a

Read More »

Lee Hoag

Born in the Southwest, my family moved to the D.C. area when I was four, where I first remember seeing artwork in museums. We then

Read More »

Ryann Cooley

While I describe myself as a mixed media artist, I am fortunate to have been granted access to the world as a photographer. Having worked

Read More »

Sunny Moxin Chen

As a Moscow-born-Chinese who migrated to the U.S. since high school, I consciously and unconsciously use my art as a medium to link my multi-cultural

Read More »

Carol Nickol

From the moment I entered metal class roughly 25 years ago, I knew metal was going to be the major focus in my life from

Read More »

Jesse Aridoux

What interests me most are the stories. We blaze through life like shooting stars, and we leave fragments of stories scattered behind us like autumn

Read More »

Louis Quaintance

Demonstration Plastik abb.163, the piece included in the Small Works exhibition, is a signature work, a particularly interesting bronze sculpture in the collection… describing a

Read More »

Lee Hoag

Born in the Southwest, my family moved to the D.C. area when I was four, where I first remember seeing artwork in museums. We then

Read More »

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.